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George Fox College 



The Crescent] 



volume xxxrv 



NEWBERG, OREGON, DECEMBER 20, 1922 



NUMBER 5 



OPENING GAMES WON BY 
JUNIOR-SENIOR AND 
SOPOEAMS 

Interclass Basketball Games Cause 
Considerable Interest 



The first of the inter-class basket- 
ball games were played Friday, De- 
cember 15, when the! junior-senior 
team defeated the fast Academy five 
and the sophomores won from the 
freshmen. The first game was very 
close, the final score being 20 to 17, 
while the second ended with the 
count of 22 to 10. 

The first contest began shortly af- 
ter four o'clock but was not won un- 
til the' last few minutes of play. Ev- 
ery player was determined that his 
team should be the victor and the 
first half was a continual scramble 
for the ball with much shooting from 
difficult angles by the preps and lit- 
tle hitting of the basket by either 
side. The upper classmen had prac- 
ticed together but very little and 
consequently were outclassed by 
their opponents in team work, but 
they were more accurate in their 
shooting which accounts for their 
winning. The first half ended with 
the score standing 6 to 6. 

Between halves the Academy 
rooters proved themselves to be very 
much alive and the junior-senior 
girls madeup for their lack of num- 
bers by the volume of their noise. 
Thus the excitement was high when 
the second half began. As before, 
neither team was able to gain a 
dangerous lead. First one side would 
forge ahead a point or two and then 
the other. At one time the score was 
12 to 12 and again 15 to 15. During 
the last five minutes, however, the 
upper classmen caged two baskets in 
quick succession and held their small 
lead until the final whistle blew. 
Cramlett of the senior class played a 
goodi game at guard, considering the 
fact that it was his first attempt to 
play basketball, but, as a whole, it 
would be hard to say that any one 
player starred for either team. 

The second game began immedi- 
ately after the first was finished, 
and again there was little scoring 
during the first half. The sophs 
were expected to win easily as three 
of last year's letter men are in this 
class, but the frosh soon proved that 
the sophs had a hard job before 
them. The ball was passed back and 
forth from one end of the floor to 
the other, but neither team was able 
to find the ring with any consist- 
ency. When the first half closed, the 
Bcore was 6 to 3 in favor of the Boph- 
omores. 

During the second period, how- 
ever, experience began to tell and 
the lead of the sophs increased more 
rapidly. The wearers of the green 
never stopped fighting for a moment 
but they were unable to break 
through the strong defence of their 
opponets and the three baskets they 
made were on long shots. As a 
whole, the game was quite well 
played for so early in the season, and 



(Continued on page three) 



CHRISTMAS CELEBRATED AT 
KANYON HALL 



For a whole week at the dorm, all 
had been mystery and secrets. At 
times the parlors would be closed 
and locked, and at other times it 
was found necessary to shut one's 
door to keep from hearing secrets 
which were non of one's business. 
Then the cause of all these happen- 
ings was found out, it was all in 
preparation for a Christmas party. 

It happened on last Friday night, 
this jolly party, and everyone be- 
longing to the boys' and girls' dorm 
was there. They draped themselves 
on the couch and In the chairs and 
on the floor, and after everyone was 
comfy and ready to listen, Bernice 
Hinshaw began the program by play- 
ing a piano solo. Of course we don't 
need to inform you that it was beau- 
tiful, because everyone takes it for 
granted without being told. 

Then the assemblage grouped it- 
self in a circle around Flora Camp- 
bell and she read a story as only 
Flora can read. From the "Once up- 
on a time" to the place where it 
says "And they all lived happily ever 
after," the story was so interesting 
as to hold the attention of all the 
listeners and that is saying a mouth- 
ful. 

The lights were then darkened 
and a lovely glow shone on six girls 
who gave a patomime of "Holy 
Night." This would have been the 
bestj thing on the program if the 
other things hadn't been sd good. 

Professor Jones made his appear- 
ance on the scene and surprised us 
by playing two 'cello solos. 

Eight girls then sang a Christmas 
carol which was a pretty little thing, 
and Walter Cook delighted us all 
with a reading. 

Then last but not least came the 
"Wedding of Santa Claus and Mother 
Goose." Brooks took the part of 
Santa Claus and Leona Brown was 
his blushing bride. These faithful 
followers of Hymen were accompan- 
ied by Hulda Winslow as Mary Quite 
Contrary, Little Connie Chenoweth 
as Bo Peep, Mildred Sallee as Little 
Miss Muffit, Hubert Armstrong as 
Simple Simon, and Albert Windell as 
Little Boy Blue. Ben Darling tied 
the knot. The wedding party trip- 
ped (?) in, to the strains of the 
wedding march played by Bernice. 

A knocking was heard and when 
Babe Tucker flew to the window 
and threw up the sash, in climbed 
the jolliest of Santas. We know he 
was a very wise Santa to choose the 
window instead of anything connec- 
ted with the dorm heating system. 
Ask Albert Windell. 

Brooks, for it was none other than 
that dear boy, handed every girl and 
boy a gife and then gave to each and 
every one a sock full of popcorn, nuts 
and candy. The gifts were all recog- 
nized as coming from the toy coun- 
ter at the Fair Store, and the child- 
ren were very happy. 

Santa took his leave in a short 
time and then the other guests fol- 
lowed suit, with Merry Christmas to 
all and to all goodnight. 

o 

Numerically Speaking 

"Say," whispered the fraction to 
the mixed number at the Numbers' 
Ball, "is my numerator on straight?" 



M. G. ELLIOTT SPEAKS ON Y. M. 
AS A VOCA TION 

That there is a wide field for 
practical service in the Y. M. C. A. 
was affirmed by Meade G. Elliott, in 
a vocational address at the college 
Tuesday morning. 

Mr. Elliott spoke with authority 
on Y. M. work, having been identi- 
fied with the Seattle Y. M. C. A. In 
a leading capacity for the past three 
years. 

Distinguishing betweeen job, po- 
sition, profession, and calling, the 
speaker placed Y. M. under the sta- 
tus of a calling. The difference lies 
mainly in the motive behind the 
choice, however. Some may have 
only a selfish motive, while others 
may wish to render a certain degree 
of service. 

"From it's meagre beginning in 
London some years ago," continued 
the speaker, "the Y. M. C. A. has at- 
tained world-wide proportions. There 
is continually a call for efficient sec- 
retaries in the various departments." 

"Where does my field of work 
lie?" is a question every young man 
deciding on a career should ask him- 
self," said Mr. Elliott. "The work 
of Y. M. is essentially religious and 
opens several phases of activity to 
those so turned. In the industrial 
field, among the churches, in educa- 
tion, and the directing of physical 
activities, there are openings for 
Y. M. workers continually." In 
boys' work, which is Mr. Elliott's 
special field, there is considerable 
satisfaction he} said, in helping to 
develop young boys during their for- 
mative period. 

Perhaps one of the most helpful 
and appealing services is that of the 
employment department. "Here," 
said Mr. Elliott, "was a real chance 
to help the man who was down and 
out; and more than to simply help 
the man into a job." 

Education is also a vital part of 
Y. M. C. A. work. In its schools 
are now enrolled 38,000 students. It 
is doing a big work in Americaniz- 
ation, beside fitting men to be more 
efficient in their respective positions 
in life. 

The life of a Y. M. C. A. secretary 
is no snap, asserted the speaker, and 
requires a great deal of energy and 
patience. The hours are often long 
and irregular, with sometimes dis- 
appointing returns in desired results. 
On the whole, however, it is a splen- 
did work; it has been helped by war 
criticism; and it is trying to put the 
Kingdom of God across in a red- 
blooded manner. 

Mr. Elliott is a former Newberg 
boy, a graduate of Pacific College, 
and is now a secretary in the Y. M. 
C. A. at Salem. 



FIRST BASKETBALL GAME TO BE 
PLAYED JANUARY 5 



Following the interclass basket- 
ball series, the Varsity will begin 
consistent practice for the first game 
of the season, that with Monmouth 
on our floor, January 5. This may 
seem to be a short training period, 
but with four letter men back. Pa- 
cific should win easily over the 
"school ana'ams." 

o 

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LYCEUM NUMBER GIVEN 
BY MUSIC FACULTY 
IS PLEASING 

Varied Program Is Presented by the 
Hulls and Local Musicians 



The Hulls, widely popular heads 
of the Pacific College jnusic depart- 
ment, presented the third number of 
the lyceum course Monday evening, 
December 18. As Professor Lewis 
remarked last week before a chapel 
audience, "The Hulls are too good 
for us." They might be giving en- 
tertainment and musical education 
to a much larger community. 

With the Hulls appeared Professor 
R. W. Lewis and Professor Chester 
Jones, 'cellists, and Winona Smith, 
Clifton Parrett and Royal Gettmann, 
violinists. A fair number of people 
braved the extremely unpleasant 
weather In anticipation of an eve- 
ning of real enjoyment, and were 
evidently very glad of their bravery. 

Prof. HuII'b "new departure," the 
presentation of negro poems as 
pianologues were Indeed delightful. 
His excellent voice, his sympathetic 
interest in the darky, and the fact 
that he is he and the poems were 
just those poems, made a most ac- 
ceptable combination. 

His humorous and instructive com- 
ments interlarded with the numbers 
is always appreciated. Monday he 
gave a particularly interesting in- 
troduction to the melodrama, a mus- 
ical interpretation of "The Belfry of 
Bruges," by Longfellow. The read- 
ing was given by Prof. Hull; his 
mother played the accompaniment. 
The composition was appreciated for 
its beauty as well as for its unique 
character. 

The full program is given below 
and comment further than that the 
whole program was well up to the 
Hulls' standard of performance is 
unnecessary. Their audience enjoy- 
ed it all, from Professor Hull's grand 
opera aria to the ladies' charming 
gowns. 

Serenade (Pierne), strings. 

Gavotte for two pianos (Saar), 
Mrs. Eva Hummer Hull, Alexander 
Hull. 

Spring Fever (Koerner), Itching 
Heels (Koerner), Alexander Hull. 

The Fam'ly Tree, The Argument, 
Mammy's Lullaby, all by Loomis, 
Alexander Hull. 

Raindrop (Kopylow), Nocturne in 
F minor (Chopin), Mrs. Eva Hum- 
mer Hull. 

The Belfry of Bruges (Miersch), 
Alexander Hull, Mrs. Hull. 

Andante Sostenuto (Bargiel), 
strings. 

As On the Swelling 1 Wave (Cal- 
dara) , Arioso from I. Paggliaccl (Le- 
oncavallo), Alexander Hull and 
strings. 

Liebesleid, for cello, (Kreisler), 
To a Wild Rose, for cello, (MacDow- 
ell) Alexander Hull. 

Accountability (Hull), Peter, Go 
Ring-a Dem Bells, negro spiritual, 
Didn' It Rain, negro spiritual, Ex- 
hortation (Cook), Alexander Hull. 

Waltz-Scherzo, (Straus), strings. 



THE CRESCENT 



DORM DOPE 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at post office at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



Royal Gettmann . , . . Editor-in-Chief 

Ben Darling Assistant Editor 

Flora E. Campbell Society Editor 

Cecil P. Hinshaw Sports Editor 

John Chenevert . . Business Manager 

Therman Evans Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Davis Woodward . . Circulation Mgr. 

REPORTERS — Lucille Johnson, 
Cecil R. Hinshaw, Harriett Hodgin, 
Davis Woodward, Esther Haworth, 
Olive Terrell, Jewel Williams, Char- 
lotte Jones and Florence Heater. 



Terms: $1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



WHY NOT? 

Oscar Wilde has said: "If there 
is anything worse than being tallied 
about,, it is not being talked about." 
Now, without discussing Wilde's 
merits, let us take the latter part of 
his axiom as our theme and begin 
by saying that Pacific is in a very 
bad way, because it is not being 
talked about. There are many peo- 
ple who have a hazy hunch that there 
is, or used to be, a Quaker school at 
Newberg, but of its activities they 
know nothing. We do not give our- 
selves enough publicity and pass up 
many good methods of advertise- 
ment. For instance, last week, Al- 
bany had a headlined article in the 
Oregonian which read like this: "35 
basketball men respond to Coach 
'Make-Em-Work's' call. Albany is 
very fortunate in having four of last 
year's team back." Thus the article 
spread it on for about 300 words. 
We can't understand how Albany 
has the champioshiip tucked away, 
nor do we believe they will produce 
an extraordinary team, but the point 
is this — they are advertising their 
school. Three or four days later 
Linfield had a write-up of a similar 
nature in the Oregonian. Why not 
let the state know that we are in 
the ring with the rest of them? To 
cite another example, some time ago 
Philomath, had an article in the Ore- 
gonian something like this: "Philo- 
math college chorus of voices to pre- 
sent cantata, with the accompani- 
ment of the college orchestra." We 
understand that the Philomath Col- 
lege enrollment is about 71, includ- 
ing the academy students, faculty 
members and board of trustees, yet 
they gave their chorus a neat little 
boost, while we said nothing of the 
concert given by our chorus. 

We would suggest that this exces- 
sive modesty be cast off and Pacific 
placed in the limelight. In order to 
be standardized, Pacific must have, 
among other things, a reputation, 
and to gain one, we must give our 
activities publicity through the Port- 
land papers. Why not send in the 
results of the inter-class basketball 
series, the work of the debate teams, 
and our progress in oratory? We do 
not mean to criticize anyone in par- 
ticular, and we realize that it is 
simply a case of negligence, but isn't 
it about time for Pacific to receive 
the recognition that is due her? 

Why not? 



Tryouts for the Intercollegiate 
Peace Contest which will be held at 
Willamette in April must take place 
not later than the third Friday in 
March. Persons who have a concern 
for this contest will do well to work 
on peace orations while the fever of 
the I. O. A. 0. preparations are in 
the air. 



Miss Rena Johnson finds it quite 
interesting sometimes to be sick. Es- 
pecially when eighteen letters are 
handed her all at once. 



Bernice Hinshaw was delighted 
the other evening when she remarked 
about her preserved seat for lyceum. 
I wonder why preserved? 



According to Olive Terrell the 
"Carnation" quartet were noisily 
"charivaried" last Saturday evening. 



Students who remain in the dorms 
during the holiday season are look- 
ing forward to a real Christmas din- 
ner "at home" among themselves. 



Hulda Winslow was indeed happy 
to meet her father on the campus for 
a little while the past week, and is 
looking forward with real pleasure 
to a short visit from her mother. 



You, ought to drop in some Monday 
evening at parlor meeting and see 
the knitting needles, embroidery 
needles and crochet hooks all work- 
ing industriously. It's almost Christ- 
mas, you see! 



Another birthday comes next 
week at Albert Wendell's table. 
Aren't we glad? 



(Repeated in the dorm parlor.) — 
Walter C. to C. R.: "Say, do your 
Hps ever quiver?" 

C. R. — "No, why? Do yours?" 

W. C. — "Yes, when I get them in 
a certain position they do." 
o 

Y. W. 

The Y. W. Thanksgiving service 
was held Wednesday, December 6, 
with Olive Terrell as leader. We 
were especially favored by a solo 
given by Professor Lewis. Instead 
of the leader's talk, several girls ap- 
peared representing different un- 
pleasing and pitiful conditions we 
meet and hear of. There was the 
poor family, the house maid, the 
cannery girl, the troubled Japanese 
girl, and the discontented society 
girl. These, in turn, came to the 
Y. W. girl and the missionary. The 
Y. W. girl tells what she and her 
friends have been trying to do for 
them to relieve them from at least 
some of their troubles. Then the 
missionary, who carries with her an 
expresion of the secret of happiness 
and thanksgiving, comforts their 
hearts with a message from the 
scripture. From this dialogue the 
Y. W. girls studied out for them- 
selves what they had to be thankful 
for. 



MBS. EMEEICH SPEAKS ON NEAR 
EAST 



Mr. Handsaker, the Near East re- 
lief director of Oregon, introduced 
Mrs. Emerich, one of the relief 
workers in chapel Thursday, De- 
cember 14. Mrs. Emerich has spent 
several years in the relief work and 
has only been back in the states 
since early fall. She gave a brief 
review of the actual conditions in 
the Near East during August, before 
the destruction of Smyrna. 

She said that the question, most 
frequently asked her, is, "Just what 
is the use of contributing to the re- 
lief fund if the refugees are to be 
killed sooner or later by the Turks?" 

The speaker said that the Turkish 
authorities advised the relief work- 
ers to remove their refugees about 
six weeks before the Smyrna disaster 
and that 90 per cent of the refugees 
are now located in territory beyond 
Turkish control, or are under the 
American flag where they are safe. 
The survival of the Armenians now 
only depends upon the shipments of 
supplies by America and other na- 
tions. Mrs. Emerich said that the 
winter's supplies in the warehouses 
at Constantinople, which were in- 
tended for the orphanages, were 
completely exhausted during the 
burning of Smyrna. This unexpect- 
ed disaster necessitated both the 
stripping of the food warehouses and 
the complete depletion of funds, and 
resulted in a reduction of rations and 
loss of medical treatment. The im- 
provement in the health of orphans 
during the last three years will be 
lost if aid is not soon received. 

The speaker asserted that inter- 
national relief was impossible, and 
although the international commit- 
tee conducted an Investigation, the 
Turkish authorities conducted it 
personally and as a result the inspec- 
tion' tour was a failure. Mrs. Emer- 
ich said the only hope was in the 
sacrifices of the American people 
and that much aid would be re- 
ceived from the American students. 



Black 122 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 

THE REX ALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION PRUGGIST 



VINCENT'S FEED STORE 

808 First Street 

Best Quality of 
FEED AND FLOUR 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 
Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



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An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Y. M. 

The Y. M. meeting of December 
13 was led bf Albert Reid, who has 
had considerable experience in mis- 
sionary work. He spoke of the val- 
uable work being done by the home 
missionaries, especially in the south- 
ern states, but said that since each 
man is his brother's keeper, those 
who are unable to give active service 
in the mission field still have many 
opportunities for uplifting mankind. 
Mr. Reid warned college students 
against the mistaken but popular 
idea that college is the preparation 
for life. He asserted that college is 
life itself, and that students do not 
have to wait until after graduation 
to do big things, but by some slight 
service can aid the struggling fel- 
low student. The speaker gave act- 
ual instances of seemingly insignifi- 
cant acts saving people from degra- 
dation and lives of sin. He closed by 
advising the men to be ever-watchful 
and helpful in their everyday school 
life. 



SHOE SHINE PARLOR 
Best of Shines Efficient Service 
Candy Bars, Good Confections 
BOB WALKER 



BAGS 
TRUNKS and GLOVES 

703 First Street 
A. C. SMITH 



VISIT THE FAIR 
5c and 10c Store 
WALLACE & SON 

607 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



STUDENTS 

For the easiest shave and 
most up-to-date hair cut, 
go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 
OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 



McCOY BROTHERS 

Dealers in 
DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR CAR 
Automobile Supplies 



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frilj&hf Sleep 



Puts the Teeth to Sleep 
There Is No Hurt 



"For the Teeth" 



Dr. E. H. Utter 



OVER FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 



PHONE 
BLACK 243 



BISHOP JONES SPEAKS ON INTER- 
NATIONAL RECONCILIATION 



Newberg people and Pacific Col- 
lege students had an unusual oppor- 
tunity in hearing Bishop Paul Jones 
of New York City, who spoke at the 
college 1 Friday morning, December 8. 

Bishop Jones, who received con- 
siderable notoriety during the war 
because of his religious convictions, 
is now the executive secretary for the 
Fellowship of Reconciliation in the 
United States, an International vol- 
untary organization for the purpose 
of creating harmony among various 
conflicting groups in society. 

Without the usual complimentary 
and often useless remarks common to 
public speakers,. Bishop Jones launh- 
ed into his subjected by saying that 
he wanted to speak briefly about the 
principles of. honesty. Quoting from 
the writings of Dr. William Patton, 
he said "no religion has more clear- 
ly expressed the Idea of universal 
unity than Christianity, and few re- 
ligions have been less insistent up- 
on the practical application of their 
ideals," the close application of the 
Golden Rule would stir our think- 
ing in unusual ways. 

The church has never taught true 
forgiveness, said the bishop, but has 
confined itself to an intellectual con- 
ception of the thing. Forgiveness 
as a primary principle of Christianity 
reaches out and changes the heart of 
the erring one. We fail to apply this 
principle in fields most important. 
A man who breaks the moral law is 
sent to prison to be reformed, but 
when given liberty, is still unforgiv- 
en and kept beyond the sacred pre- 
cincts of society, a criminal still. 
Likewise, when a nation goes wrong, 
the armed forces are immediately 
called forth, with little or no at- 
tempt to arrange a peaceful settle- 
ment. 

Nationalism, asserted the bishop, 
is only an imperfect ideal, and with 
reference to his own church, the 
Episcopal, a church with only a na- 
tional consciousness was not chris- 
tian at all. 

The speaker attacked various in- 
consistencies of the church in its in- 
terpretation of the christian princi- 
ples. Among some of his criticisms 
were, the attitude of the church on 
humility, its application of method 
of approach, and its adoption of the 
competitive system which functions 
in modern industry and commerce. 
This method, said the bishop, was to- 
tally incompatible with christian 
principles. 

Bishop Jones spent several hours 
at the college, and was the guest of 
of Professor and Mrs. Chase L. Con- 
over while here. 

o 

Y. W. 

The Y. W. meeting of Wednesday, 
December 13, was led by the sopho- 
more girls with the subject of "Put- 
ting the Hooks and Byes On," or in 
other words, "I have finished the 
work Thou hast given me to do." 
After being led in prayer by Dilla 
Tucker, our thoughts were directed 
to a portion of the seventeenth chap- 
ter of John. We then joined In the 
singing of "Awake My Soul, Stretch 
Every Nerve," under the leadership 
of Florence Lee. The subject of the 
meeting was enlarged upon very 
skillfully by Lucille Johnson. She 
said that the girl who left off the 
hooks and eyes, or the buttons and 
buttonholes, would be the one to 
leave the rounds of the chairs un- 
dusted, or leave her studies until the 
last minute and then half-way get 
them. Then she spoke of how in our 
consecration to Christ our whole ex- 
perience is hindered if we leave off 
one little thing. 

The meeting closed with that 
rousing good song, "True Hearted, 
Whole Hearted," and the Y. W. ben- 
ediction. 



TEACHING AS A VOCATION 

Putting the advantages and dis- 
advantages of teaching as a profes- 
sion before the students of P. C, 
Amos C. Stanbrough, superintendent 
of Newberg schools, gave the fourth 
of a series of vocational addresses 
which are being held at the college 
Tuesday of each week. 

Most of us do not choose our vo- 
cations, said Mr. Stanbrough. We 
drift into them. In preventing stu- 
dents from wasting too much time in 
finding their proper niche in life 
work, the plan of presenting in de- 
tail the duties, problems and pleas- 
ures of various professions was 'a 
good one, thought Mr. Stanbrough. 

In the teaching vocation there are 
certain qualifications necessary, if 
one is to be successful, said Mr. Stan- 
brough. An optimistic nature, a 
great deal of patience, self-control, 
good health ,and in a spiritual 
sense, the spirit of fight. The men- 
tal and physical strain is great, and 
unless these qualifications are pos- 
sessed by the teacher, success is 
doubtful. 

The teacher has a big responsibil- 
ity, especially in these times, when 
the foundation of the home is so of- 
ten shaken. A wide training in the 
moral character as well as in intel- 
lectual ways should be the first con- 
sideration, asserted Mr. Stanbrough. 
Capable teachers are always in de- 
mand. 

Financially, teaching was not al- 
ways the best paying profession said 
the speaker. It did, however, offer 
permanent work to the person quali- 
fied, and there were returns which 
could not be measured in money val- 
ues. 

The child, said the speaker, was 
a bundle of posibilities, and under 
the influence of the right character 
would develop into a good man or 
woman. In the right kind of teach- 
ing lies the safeguard of the repub- 
lic, asserted Mr. Stanbrough, citing 
cases from the experience of both 
France and Germany. That is, the 
development of the soul as well as 
the intellect. 

Mr. Stanbrough in closing made a 
strong appeal to remember the teach- 
ers in their great work, who were 
too often not appreciated. 

OPENING GAMES" WON BY 

JUNIOR-SENIOR AND SOPHS 



(Continued from page one) 



the outlook is that most of the var- 
sity will come from these two classes. 

The final score was 22 to 10. 

The sophs will play the faculty 
Tuesday and the Wednesday game 
between the junior-senior and Tues- 
day's winner ' will close the tourna- 
ment. 

The line-ups: 

Junior-Senior, 20 — C. R. Hinshaw 
10, D. Woodward 10, forwards; H. 
Nottage, center; R. Haworth, T. 
Cramlett, guards. 

Academy, 17 — Sweet8, E. Everest, 
forwards; Lienard 6, center; S. 
Brown, L. Crozier, guards; Hunting- 
ton 3, sub. 

Freshmen 10 — Pearson, 6, W. 
Woodward 2, forwards; P. Brown 2, 
center; Chenevert, Jones, guards; A. 
Everest, sub. 

Sophomores 22 — Cook 6, W. Cro- 
zer 2, forwards; H. Terrell 10, cen- 
ter; B. Terrell 4, Armstrong, guards. 

Referee — C. E. Jones. 



CHRISTMAS PROGRAM GIVEN BY 
TREFIAN SOCIETY 



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SOCIETY AND COMMERCIAL 

Printing 

AT THE GRAPHIC OFFICE 



The Trefian literary society met 
in the dorm parlors December 13 for 
their Christmas meeting. The pro- 
gram began with a Christmas carol 
by the society, led by Gladys Scott. 
Tha stories of the Christmas cele- 
brations in many lands were told by 
representatives from each country in 
their native costumes. The clever- 
ness of some of the costumes speaks 
well for the originality of the de- 
signers in those far-distant coun- 
tries. Flora Campbell sang a beau- 
tiful Christmas song, "While Shep- 
herds Watched their Flocks by 
Night." 

No program would be complete 
without Christmas gifts, as we be- 
lieve. "Very original ones in the form 
of Vatchel Lindsay's Christmas 
verese were bestowed on those pres- 
ent by Lucille Clough. 

All joined in the carols, "We three 
Kings of the Orient Are," and "Joy 
to the World," as the closing num- 
ber. 



SOPHOMORE GIRLS GIVE LUNCH- 
EON FOR BOYS 



"Um-m-m!" "Never mind, I'll 
help myself." "Isn't there some- 
thing I can get you?" "Why, yes, 
I believe I will." Thus the sopho- 
mores on Monday, December 11. 

There was a special reason, too. 
The sophomore girls chose this meth- 
od of showing their appreciation for 
the work the class basket ball mien 
are going to do in the tournament. 

The lunch itself was substantial 
and judging by the rapidity with 
which it vanished, good. If there 
was anything left the diswashers 
failed to see it. 

Many deep, dark secrets of the 
"pasts" of various members of the 
class were brought to light during 
the course of the meal. Everyone 
bore up nobly under the searchlight 
of publicity, however. 

Before their departure the men of 
the class valiantly gave uncounted 
"rahs" for the hostesses. 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 
Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 

E. W. HODSON, Reg. Phar. 
School Supplies, Drags, 
Confections 
Corner First and Meridian 
/ 



QUITTING 
THE RETAIL BUSINESS 
Buy at the Golden Rule and 
SAVE! 



NEWBERG LAUNDRY 
Good Work Good Service 

TRY US 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS 
for every member of the family 
will be found at 

THE FAIR STORE 

Next to Post Office 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 
at Reasonable Prices 

CLOTHING SHOES 



KIENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 
Best of Bread; Finest Cakes, 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



You Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 

GEM BARBER SHOP 

E. L. MORLEY, PROPRIETOR 
. t 

For Service, Quality and Quantity 



THE FAMOUS 



Newberg Candy Shop 

Corner First and College 



RYGG THE TAILOR 

Tailoring, French Dry Cleaning, 
Alterations, Pressing 
602% FIRST STREET 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Delivery before and after school 
Phone Red 66 

MOORE & HANSON 



Phones: Res. Blue 121 Hours: 
Office Red 140 9 to 12, 2 to 5 

DR. ELTON B. JONES D. C, Ph.C. 

LICENSED CHIROPRACTOR 
702% First St. Newberg, Or. 
By appointm't evening & Sunday 



AMY'S CONFECTIONERY 
First Quality Confections 
Ice Cream 
EAST FIRST ST. NEWBERG 



Will B. Brooks 
PRINTER 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 

Pressing, Cleaning 
Repairing 
314 PIHST ST. NEWBERG, OR. 



"Listen In" 

WHAT YOU EAT AND WHAT 
YOU WEAK 

Get it at the 
"GOOD GOODS" HOME 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

THE STORE OP QUALITY 

Furniture, Carpets, 
Undertakers 

500 First St. Newberg, Ore. 
v s 



DB. THOS. W. HESTER 
Physician and Surgeon 
Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, - OREGON 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



Yours for Service and Quality 

ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



C. A. MOBBIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



DB. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171. 
Office over TJ. S. National Bank 



ALLEN D. ALBERT 

Patrons of the lyceum course re- 
cently enjoyed a lecture by Allen 
D. Albert, sociologist and father. 
His subject was "The Young People 
of 1923." He gave first some amus- 
ing anecdotes illustrating the dis- 
tinguishing characteristics of Euro- 
pean and American soldiers in the 
late war. It was due to the exigen- 
i cies of war that America began to 
get acquainted with its young men. 
An there Mr. Albert's lecture begins. 

The American army was made up 
of the tallest men who ever marched 
to battle. "Whatever we may say of 
today's young men, they are not 
runts." The speaker also spoke, and 
with deepest approval, of the grow- 
ing interest and proficiency of young 
women in athletics. 

The physical disposed of, he pro- 
ceeded to discuss the mental caliber 
of our youth, showing the advance 
' in intelligent educational methods, 
. both general and imoral. It was here 
I that his interest as a father made it- 
self evident. He believes the guid- 
ance of natural tendencies and de- 
sires rather than the exaction of 
conformation to fixed standards to 
be the duty of parents. 
1 A striking point which he made 
was that illegitimacy has decreased 
very considerably since the prohi- 
bition amendment went into effect. 
The percentage of illegitimate births 
has been relatively low in our coun- 
try, and it is possible for us to keep 
it so. 

The two tendencies which he re- 
' gards as deplorable are that of 
j cheap-mindedness fostered by the 
; Sunday newspaper, the bad movie 
I and the salacious song and story 
I writers, and the tendency of the 
young to drift away from the church. 
I The one duty of the church, he says, 
I is to teach the divinity of Christ 
| and to exalt the life of Christ as an 
example. The war proved that the 
young men of today are hungry for 
just that message. But the church 
I will draw the young to her only in- 
i sofar as she can minister, first, to 
their social demands. 

o 

I. 0. A. 0. HAS MEETING 

At a recent meeting of the exec- 
I utive committee of the Intercollegi- 
I ate Oratorical association of Oregon 
the committee put itself on record 
| as favoring the fonmation of a Pa- 
cific and Northwestern Oratorical as- 
sociation, including the state asso- 
ciations of Oregon, Washington, Ida- 
ho, California and Montana. By 
means of such an organization ora- 
tory will be given a more important 
place in intercollegiate activities and 
this section of the country can be 
better represented in national con- 
tests. 

According to a plan formulated 
by a group of college and university 
men of this section, an annual con- 
test would be held at one of the 
. schools holding state honors. The lo- 
' cal expenses of the contest would be 
taken care of by admission charges, 
the surplus to go to the entertaining 



BERT'S PLACE 
QUICK LUNCH 

NEXT TO McCOY'S GARAGE 



CAMPBELL'S CONFECTIONERY 
Hoeffler's Chocolates 
"MACBETH" 

Shakespeare's Classic, for Sale 



college for the advancement of for- 
ensics, and the deficit to be cared 
for by the association, if necessary. 
The prize money would be raised by 
the assessment of a fee to each col- 
lege in the association. 

The committee expects to present 
also, at the next meeting of the Ore- 
gon association, a suggestion for a 
permanent award to replace the med- 
al, which is not uniform, and which 
has little appeal to the present day 
student. 

o 

(From Oregonian of Dec. 3.) 

Eugene, Dec. 2. — Dr. Levi T. Pen- 
nington, president of Pacific at New- 
berg, today was elected president of 
the Association of Independent Col- 
leges of Oregon. 



Nine rahs for Prexy. 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, PROPRIETOR 
Ice cream and candies. We feature the famous Lowney'a candies. 
Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 
Phone Red 37 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
BOLL OF H0N0B BANK 
Capital and Surplus $100,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



FIB S T NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP Y0UB RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



0VEE U. S. BANK 



E. H. UTTEK, DENTIST 
DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY 

OFFICE OVER FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Office Phone Black 31 Residence Phone White 174 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



S. M. CALKINS & SONS 
GABAGE 

All Kinds of Repair Work Tires and Accessories 



STUDENTS ! GET Y0UE BASKETBALL SUPPLIES 

AT 

Parker Hardware Co. 



When you sit down to a meal you like to know that your food came 
from a store where reputation counts — a store where best quality 
goods are really best quality. Honest values make us grow. 

J. L. VAN BLABIC0M 



CHEERFUL SERVICE AT 

Larkin-Prince Hardware Co.